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Monday, April 22, 2019

General George Rogers Clark #kentuckypioneers #kygenealogy

General George Rogers Clark

George Rogers ClarkWith General Clark came to Louisville, in 1778, John Haggin and John Montgomery, and both were captains in his command. They landed at Corn Island, in the Ohio river, at the head of the falls, opposite where Louisville now stands. In 1782 there lived in Louisville, with their families: John MacManus, Hugh Cochran, John Doyle, John Caghey, John Cunningham, Michael Humble, John Handley, Andrew Hines, Thomas McCarty, Thomas Purcell, James Sullivan, James Brown and John McCarland, and most of these came with Clark. That was a pretty good Irish settlement for those days when a man who went out to plough corn was obliged to take his rifle along to defend himself against hostile Indians. Source: Conquest of the Northwest Territory by George Rogers Clark and his associates.



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Monday, April 15, 2019

Colonel John Campbell, Irish Presbyterian #kygenealogy #kentuckypioneers

Colonel John Campbell, Irish Presbyterian

During 1773, the first survey made of Louisville was made by Captain Thomas Bullitt; his associates were John Fitzpatrick, James, George and Robert McAfee. Dr. John Connolly owned two thousand acres of land in Louisville in 1773. Colonel John Campbell, a native of Ireland and a resident of Louisville about this time, was afterward a member of the first State Constitutional Convention, held in Danville in 1797. A proud full-blooded Irishman in this region was Colonel Campbell. He was Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives and after wards a member of Congress. He was often a delegate to the Presbyterian Synods in Kentucky and was always spoken of as an Irishman, without any prefix, though he was born in the province of Ulster. Colonel Campbell was a faithful patriot, and being a large landowner, sent for many of his countrymen to come to Louisville, which was another cause for swelling the early Irish immigration to Kentucky.



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Monday, April 8, 2019

Simon Kenton, Irishman #kygenealogy #kentuckypioneers

Simon Kenton, a Brave Irishman to Kentucky

Kenton's StationSimon Kenton, the companion of Daniel Boone, came to Kentucky in 1771 and was of Irish parentage. His father was born in County Donegal. Another Irish companion was Michael Stoner. While still a minor, Kenton fled from his state because he believed he had killed a rival for the hand of a fair Virginia damsel. Simon Kenton record said that in 1775 he located in the Upper and Lower Blue Licks where there was an abundance of game, and he considered it a paradise. When in Kentucky, assumed the name of Simon Butler. He was known for his many deeds of personal bravery; indeed, it was asserted by many that he was the greatest Indian fighter the country ever produced. In 1782, upon hearing that the man he had struck down with his fist was still alive, he resumed his name, and in 1795 served as major under General Anthony Wayne. He founded the Kenton Station and Maysville, and planted the first corn raised in the state north of Kentucky river. Michael Stoner, one of his companions and Thomas Kennedy, another Irishman, built a cabin and made some improvements on Stoners fork of Licking river, in Bourbon county in 1774. Source: Early Irish Settlers in Kentucky by Edward Fitzpatrick, Louisville, Kentucky.
. . . more . . .




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Monday, April 1, 2019

Swapping Horses #kentuckypioneers #genealogy

Swapping Horses

swapping horsesTwentieth century observers of Kentucky noted the absence of paupers and beggars in the towns. Somehow misfortune and ill-fortune and old age save themselves here from the last hard necessity of asking alms on the highway. Also, that the appearance of Kentuckians could easily lead you to a wrong impression simply because their dress and speech and manners in the market-place are not their best equipment. The Kentucky farmer or horseman has always been hard-working.



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Monday, March 25, 2019

Auctioning A Jack #genealogy #kentuckypioneers

Auctioning A Jack

Auctioning A JackThe Kentuckian nowadays does not come to county court to pick a quarrel or to settle one. He has no quarrel. His fist has reverted to its natural use and become a hand. Nor does he go armed. The gentlemen in this State no longer derive satisfaction with a fist fight in the market-place. Also, the three-cornered hat is no longer remembered. Something else has disappeared; the open use of the pioneer beverage. Merchants no longer set it out for their customers because it is no longer the law of hospitality to offer it to a guest. Also, the decanter is no longer found on the sideboard in the home and the barrel is not stored in the cellar. 



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Monday, March 18, 2019

A Good Fight in Front of the Court House #kentuckypioneers #genealogy

A Good Fight in Front of the Court House

Court House Square Lexington KentuckyA capital day in Lexington was described in The Blue Grass Region of Kentucky by James Lane Anderson as "a most admirable and serene day for fighting. Fights grew like a fresh-water polypeby being broken in two: each part produced a progeny." Thus, while the justices sat quietly on the bench inside, and the people fought quietly in the streets outside, a day of the month was set apart for the conservation of the peace for individual war. There is no evidence that either the justices or the constables ever interfered. "These pugilistic encounters had a certain law of beauty: they were affairs of equal combat and of courage. The fight over, animosity was gone, the feud ended. The men must shake hands, go and drink together, become friends." 



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Monday, March 11, 2019

John C. Calhoun had Kentucky Relatives #kentuckypioneers

John C. Calhoun

John C. CalhounJohn C. Calhoun, famous Statesman from South Carolina and the seventh Vice President of the United States from 1825 to 1832, had numerous relatives in Kentucky. Major William Love, an early Justice of the Peace,was married to Esther Calhoun, a first cousin to Senator Calhoun. Major Love was a native of South Carolina, 38 years of age at the time that he was first Justice in the area; also known to snore, according to the article. Source: The Register, Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 69, pp.265.



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Monday, March 4, 2019

Preserving the Old Traditions and Values

Preserve the Old Traditions and Values 

Working to Preserve History
While genealogists work to preserve their family histories and relate the interesting tales to their children and grandchildren, there is a disruption of traditions and beliefs encircling the globe. Every generation has treasured its ways, from the way we speak, walk, dress and act, to or spiritual beliefs.  And yet there has been no American tradition so valued as our personal freedom, and the right to worship our God.  This generation has gone awry with its preference for the re-written history of the conduct and actions of our ancestors.  Yet, somewhere back in time, in the past of the disruptor's, lies some very startling facts concerning themselves and their ancestors.

If they traced back several generations of their lineage and found some brave patriots who loved freedom and the right to worship so much they they gave their lives and fortunes for it, perhaps a greater appreciation of former generations would awaken them from the deep sleep of ignorance and stupidity. 

Perhaps it is up to the old folks to restore peace, love and appreciation for those who came before us by writing more articles and telling more stories on the Internet of how the ancestors sacrificed everything for their posterity!  Then, while the disruptor's are wasting their youth spouting anger, marching in parades, littering our streets, vandalizing homes and stores, etc., we will be writing the history of today, of how much we still care for our traditions and values.  




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Monday, February 25, 2019

Look for the Names of your Ancestors on Monuments

Look for the Names of your Ancestors on Monuments

Egyptian Hierglyphs
Throughout the ages, mankind has recorded history in a number of ways, viz: clay tablets, brass plates, papyrus, cement, etc. The case of erecting monuments is universal and dates back to ancient times.

The cuneiform writing of the Sumerians, Egyption hierglyphs, Cretan hieroglyphs, Chinese hieroglyphs, Indus script and the Olmec script of Mesoamerica are but a few methods used in the preservation of historical events and populations. Not to mention monuments, gravestones, footstones, markers, obelisks, plaques and cairns which were included in ancient cities, towns and kingdoms across the map.  And America came along and adopted that same practice.

Once, while visitiing the Gwinnett County Court House, I noticed a monument in front which told about the militia driving an Indians war party from Georgia in 1834.  The list of those who fought included the children of one of my ancestors!  For years I had searched for the names of his children and here was the date and place of an event which recorded their deaths!   The monuments are a great help to remembering historical events which occurred in other times. 

That makes the vandelism and destruction of our historical monuments as one of the worst atrocities in all the history of mankind on this earth!




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Monday, February 18, 2019

Why Tracing Back 4 Generations is a Break-Through in the Family Tree

Why Tracing Back 4 Generations is a Break-Through in the Family Tree 


Theoretically, one should easily trace his lineage back 4 generations to the great grandparents using census records. If this much is accomplished, at the point of the great grandparents, it should be fairly easy to find others sharing the same lineage. The 1850 census was the first census to provide the names and ages of all family members, including where they were born. From 1790 to 1840, the date ranges help estimate the births of the children, but you do not get the names. For this information, one must turn their research to deeds, wills, estates, marriages, tax digests, etc. in the county records where an ancestor resided. With each generation backwards, this process is repeated. One can find the ancestors in American county records dating back to the first immigrants.
Pendleton Co. KY Wills and Estates. See Names.


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